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Dr. Rebecca Rolfe

Research Fellow (Zoology)
ZOOLOGY BUILDING


Rebecca joined the group as a Research and Teaching Fellow in September 2016. Dr Rolfe began her studies in physiology, graduating from the Physiology Department in Trinity College Dublin. Her interest in Developmental Biology began during her time studying her research masters in Biomedicine in University College London. She undertook her interdisciplinary doctoral research within the Developmental Biology and Bioengineering groups in Trinity College Dublin, examining the identification of genes that respond to mechanical stimulation, during skeletal development. She then continued this interest in how mechanical stimulation influences skeletal development during her Leverhulme funded postdoctoral research in the bioengineering department in Imperial College London, specifically examining the role mechanical stimulation has on spine development.
  BONE GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT   Cell and tissue development   DEVELOPMENT   Developmental Biology   EMBRYO DEVELOPMENT
Shea C.A., Rolfe R.A., McNeill H., AND Murphy P., Localization of YAP activity in developing skeletal rudiments is responsive to mechanical stimulation, Developmental Dynamics , 249, (4), 2020, p523 - 542, Journal Article, PUBLISHED  TARA - Full Text  DOI  Other
A. Levillain , R.A. Rolfe, Y. Huang, J.C. Iatridis and N.C. Nowlan , SHORT-TERM FOETAL IMMOBILITY TEMPORALLY AND PROGRESSIVELY AFFECTS CHICK SPINAL CURVATURE AND ANATOMY AND RIB DEVELOPMENT, eCELLS and MATERIALS, 37, 2019, p23 - 31, Journal Article, PUBLISHED  DOI
V Sotiriou, RA Rolfe, P Murphy, NC Nowlan, Effects of abnormal muscle forces on prenatal joint morphogenesis in mice, Jounral of Orthopaedic Research, 37, (11), 2019, p2287 - 2296, Journal Article, PUBLISHED  DOI  Other
Techniques for Studying Mechanobiology in, Mechanobiology in Health and Disease , Elsivier, 2018, [Rebecca A. Rolfe], Book Chapter, PUBLISHED
Pratik Narendra Pratap Singh, Claire Shea, Shashank Kumar Sonker, Rebecca Rolfe, Ayan Ray, Sandeep Kumar, Pankaj Gupta, Paula Murphy, Amitabha Bandyopadhyay, Precise spatial restriction of BMP signaling in developing joints is perturbed upon loss of embryo movement, Development, 145, (5), 2018, pdev153460-, Journal Article, PUBLISHED  DOI  URL
Rolfe RA, Shea CA, Singh PNP, Bandyopadhyay A, Murphy P, Investigating the mechanistic basis of biomechanical input controlling skeletal development: exploring the interplay with Wnt signalling at the joint, Philisophical Transactions of the Royal society, 2018, Journal Article, PUBLISHED  DOI  URL
Rebecca A Rolfe, James H Bezer, Tyler Kim, Ahmed Z Zaidon, Michelle L Oyen, James C Iatridis, Niamh C Nowlan, Abnormal fetal muscle forces result in defects in spinal curvature and alterations in vertebral segmentation and shape, Journal Orthop Research, 35, (10), 2017, p2135 - 2144, Journal Article, PUBLISHED  DOI  URL
Saha, A., Rolfe, R., Carroll, S., Kelly, D.J., Murphy, P., Chondrogenesis of embryonic limb bud cells in micromass culture progresses rapidly to hypertrophy and is modulated by hydrostatic pressure, Cell and Tissue Research, 368, (1), 2017, p47-59 , Journal Article, PUBLISHED  DOI  URL
CA Shea, RA Rolfe, P Murphy, The importance of foetal movement for co-ordinated cartilage and bone development in utero, Bone and Joint Research, 4, (7), 2015, p105 - 116, Journal Article, PUBLISHED  DOI  URL
Rolfe,Rebecca A. , Nowlan,Niamh C. , Kenny,Elaine M. , Cormican,Paul , Morris,Derek W. , Prendergast, Patrick J. ., Kelly, Daniel John ., Murphy, P., Identification of mechanosensitive genes during skeletal development: Alteration of genes associated with cytoskeletal rearrangement and cell signalling pathways, BMC Genomics, 15, (1), 2014, p48-, Journal Article, PUBLISHED  TARA - Full Text  DOI  URL
  

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Role of mechanical stimulation during skeletal development? How do tissues derive their distinct identities? Can knowledge obtained from the embryo be applied to in vitro differentiation regimes to engineer tissue, and be applied to help improve knowledge of congenital abnormalities for medial application?