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Personal Information
College Photo Name Mc Gilp, John Finlay
Main Department Physics
College Title Professor of Surface & Interface Optics
E-mail john.mcgilp@tcd.ie
College Tel +353 1 896 1733
Web http://www.tcd.ie/Physics/Surfaces/research.php
Fax +353 1 671 1759
 
Biography
Internationally known for: establishing the field of epioptics in Europe (optical characterisation of surfaces and interfaces); developing the first sol-gel, caged chromophore, evanescent wave optical sensor. Invited talks (last 5 years): given at seven international conferences on optical probes for surfaces, interfaces and thin films (epioptics). Over 100 peer-reviewed publications, with ~ 1400 S.C.I. citations.
 
Membership of Professional Institutions, Associations, Societies
Details Date From Date To
Royal Irish Academy, Institute of Physics, American Vacuum Society, Materials Research Society
 
Awards and Honours
Award Date
Member of the Royal Irish Academy 2003
Fellow of Trinity College, Dublin 1991
Fellow of the Instutute of Physics 1988
 
Languages
Language Skill Reading Skill Writing Skill Speaking
English Fluent Fluent Fluent
 
Description of Research Interests
Surface and interface physics; epitaxial growth of nanostructured material on planar surfaces; low dimensional magnetic nanostructures. Linear and nonlinear optical response of surfaces, interfaces and ultrathin films. Optical response of capped nanostructures.
 
Research Interests
2ND HARMONIC GENERATION Condensed matter, optical and dielectric properties ELECTRONIC-STRUCTURE ELLIPSOMETRY
EPIOPTICS FILMS GLASSES HYPERPOLARIZABILITIES
INTERFACES LOW-ENERGY ELECTRON DIFFRACTION (LEED) METAL-SEMICONDUCTOR INTERFACES METAL-SURFACES
MOLECULAR-ORIENTATION MONOLAYERS Magnetism and spin electronics Nanotechnology
OPTICAL-PROPERTIES PHOTOEMISSION QUANTUM CHAINS QUANTUM DOTS
REFLECTANCE SECOND HARMONIC GENERATION SEMICONDUCTOR SURFACES SILICON
SURFACES Semiconductor physics and technologies Surface Physics Surface and interface physics
VICINAL SI(111) SURFACES
 
Research Projects
Project title Band structure engineering of atomic wires on semiconductor surfaces
Summary The electrical properties of nanostructures is of huge importance, because progress in ICT is driven by making electronic devices with smaller active regions that are faster and more energy efficient. Aligned atomic chains of gold have recently been grown on silicon and germanium surfaces by self-assembly. Band-gap engineering of these ultimate atomic nanostructures appears possible, but the physics is controversial. A new interface optical probe, combined with state-of-the-art calculations using high-performance computers, will be used to solve this frontiers research problem and to probe whether band-gap engineered atomic wires can be protected from degradation by capping.
Funding Agency Science foundation Ireland
Programme Research Frontiers Programme
Type of Project Basic research
Date from 1/10/2011
Date to 30/9/15
Person Months 10


Project title Chiral structures at crystalline interfaces
Summary The molecules of life are chiral. For ICT, advanced materials for biological recognition and biochemical sensing will need chiral molecular structures attached to silicon surfaces to functionalise them. Biological amino acids are levorotatory, but circular dichroism cannot detect chirality in monolayers at surfaces, as the response is very weak. Progress is slow in this important materials area. The project will grow chiral structures on crystalline silicon, gold and silver, using second-harmonic (SH) generation to detect the chirality. Femtosecond laser pulses will be amplified and tuned into electronic resonances at the SH frequency to produce measurable signals without damaging the material.
Funding Agency SFI
Programme Research Frontiers
Type of Project Basic Research
Date from 1/7/08
Date to 30/6/11
Person Months 4


Project title In situ characterization and control of defects at the interface between new high-k dielectric materials and silicon
Summary Progress in ICT requires making electronic devices with smaller active regions, because these are faster and more efficient. Nanoscale features of 45nm on silicon are being developed, requiring SiO2 gate oxides <1nm thick, which then leak by quantum mechanical tunneling. High-k dielectrics offer the possibility of using thicker layers to deliver the required performance with the same chip architecture. Growing new, high-k gate oxide is very difficult and will be optimized by a new application of electric-field-induced second-harmonic generation to make in situ, contactless measurements of the band offset and defect density at the oxide interface during growth.
Funding Agency SFI
Programme Research Frontiers
Type of Project Basic Research
Date from 1/6/07
Date to 31/5/10
Person Months 4


Project title Protecting nanowires grown on planar silicon
Summary Progress in ICT is driven by making electronic devices with ever smaller active regions, because these produce faster and more efficient devices. Aligned atomic wires of indium have been successfully grown on silicon single crystal surfaces by nucleation at atomic steps but, to be useful, such nanowires must be capped by ultra-thin films to protect them from contamination. The interfacial region formed by capping will have a critical effect on the properties of these nanowires. New linear and nonlinear optical techniques, using a femtosecond laser, will be used to probe the crystallographic and electronic structure of this unexplored interfacial region.
Funding Agency SFI
Programme Research Frontiers
Type of Project Basic Research
Date from 1/6/06
Date to 31/5/09
Person Months 4


Project title Nanoscale magnetism in atomic wires protected by capping layers
Summary Progress in ICT is driven by making electronic and magnetic devices with ever smaller active regions, because these produce faster and more efficient devices. Single atomic wires of cobalt, possessing unusual magnetic properties, have been successfully grown on platinum single crystal surfaces but, to be useful, such nanowires must be capped by ultra-thin films to protect them from contamination. The interfacial region formed by capping will affect the properties of these nanoscale magnetic structures. New linear and nonlinear magneto-optic techniques, using a femtosecond laser, will be used to probe the crystallographic and magnetic structure of this critical interfacial region.
Funding Agency SFI
Programme Research Frontiers
Type of Project Basic Research
Date from 1/8/05
Date to 31/1/09
Person Months 4


 
Publications and Other Research Outputs
Peer Reviewed
Jorgji, S., McGilp, J.F., Patterson, C.H., Reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy of Si(111)-(31)Li and Ag surfaces, Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, 87, (19), 2013, part. no. 195304
Notes: [ ]
TARA - Full Text  DOI
K. Fleischer , S. Chandola, N. Esser, W. Richter, J. F. McGilp, Phonon- and Polarized Reflectance-Spectra from Si(111)-4x1-In: Evidence for a CDW driven phase transition?, Physical Review B, 67, 2003, p235318/1 - 6
MCGILP, JF, EPIOPTICS: PROGRESS AND OPPORTUNITY, THIN SOLID FILMS, 313, 1998, p533 - 536
GAPONENKO, NV, MUDRYI, AV, SERGEEV, OV, BORISENKO, VE, PIVIN, JC, BARAN, AS, STEPANOVA, EA, RATKO, AI, MCGILP, JF, ERBIUM AND TERBIUM LUMINESCENCE FROM SOL-GEL DERIVED IN2O3 FILMS ON POROUS SILICON, PHYSICA STATUS SOLIDI A-APPLIED RESEARCH, 165, 1998, p131 - 134
GAPONENKO, NV, PARKUN, VM, KATERNOGA, OS, BORISENKO, VE, MUDRYI, AV, STEPANOVA, EA, RATKO, AI, CAVANAGH, M, OKELLY, B, MCGILP, JF, ERBIUM AND TERBIUM PHOTOLUMINESCENCE IN SILICA SOL-GEL FILMS ON POROUS ALUMINA, THIN SOLID FILMS, 297, 1997, p202 - 206
More Publications and Other Research Outputs >>>
 

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