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Personal Information
Name Meskell, Craig
Main Department Mechanical & Manuf. Eng
College Title Associate Professor
E-mail cmeskell@tcd.ie
College Tel +353 1 896 1455
Web http://www.mme.tcd.ie/
 
Biography
Dr. Craig Meskell is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering in Trinity College, Dublin. His primary degree is in Aeronautical Engineering from QUB. He earned his PhD for work on flow-induced vibration in heat exchanger tube bundles. He has also been a Visiting Professor at McMaster University. His technical expertise is in the area of unsteady fluid mechanics, especially when coupled with noise, vibration or structural interaction. For nearly a decade, he has focussed his work almost exclusively on power generating and energy conversion applications, having been active in the field of aircraft noise at a European level. His favourite colour is red Recent and ongoing projects include: flow-induced vibration in nuclear steam generators; flow-induced noise in gas heat exchangers; system identification for wave energy conversion devices; modelling of flow-induced vibration in large, commercial scale wind turbines; and energy efficiency through optimized compressed air use in industrial scale manufacturing sites. Support for his work on energy devices has come from SFI, IRCSET, EI, HEA.
 
Description of Research Interests
Unsteady fluid mechanics in power generation applications; Energy Efficiency in Manufacturing; Fluid induced vibration and noise; system identification
 
Research Interests
Aeroelasticity Fluid Dynamics Fluids and vibration Industrial Processes, Energy Use
Nuclear Reactor Technology Tidal and Wave Energy Vibration and Accoustic Engineering Wind, Wind Energy Engineering
 
Research Projects
Project title Modelling acoustic resonance in heat exchangers
Summary Heat exchangers can exhibit periodic vortex shedding. If the fluid is gas flow, then the vortex shedding may excite an acoustic duct mode and hence cause acoustic resonance. The acoustic sources are distributed and diffuse. The onset, and lock-in behaviour depends on the non-linear interaction between the (linear) acoustic field and the fluid dynamics. This project uses unsteady CFD to investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of acoustic sources.
Funding Agency
Programme
Type of Project
Date from Oct 2010
Date to Sept 2014
Person Months


Project title System Identification for a wave energy conversion devices
Summary The dynamics a self reacting wave energy converter, especially as it exhibits parametric roll/pitch, are modelled using a non-linear panel method. The response obtained is used to identify a simplified 7 degree of freedom lumped parameter model.
Funding Agency Wavebob and IRCSET
Programme EPS
Type of Project
Date from Oct 2010
Date to Sept 2014
Person Months


Project title Flow-induced vibration of nuclear steam generators
Summary Nuclear power plant depends on large heat exchangers, called steam generators, to transfer the heat from the reactor to steam, so that electricity can be generated at the turbines. These steam generators are effective bundles of long, thin (and hence flexible) tubes subject to flow perpendicular to their axes. This gives rise to the possibility of flow-induced vibration. In this project we are investigating a recently discovered phenomenon in tube arrays, called bi-stable flow. We are focussing on a tube bundle arrange in a parallel triangular array pattern with a pitch ratio of 1.375 as this is typical of what is used in CANDU reactors.
Funding Agency HEA
Programme
Type of Project
Date from Oct 2011
Date to Sept 2015
Person Months


Project title Investigation of flow-induced vibration of horizontal axis wind turbines
Summary Industrial scale wind turbines must be able to withstand occasional extreme winds. This includes gusts which cause a rapid change in wind direction. This will mean that the blades are now are very high, even reflexive, angles of incidence to the flow, and so may be considered as bluff bodies, rather than streamlined lifting surfaces. In this project, we investigate the possibility of wind turbine blade sections experiencing vortex shedding, and vortex shedding lock-in due to structural motion, at high angles of attack. The simulated data is used to obtain a simple non-linear wake model which is coupled to the motion of the structure.
Funding Agency EU
Programme ITN SYSWIND
Type of Project
Date from Oct 2010
Date to Sept 2014
Person Months


 
Publications and Other Research Outputs
Peer Reviewed
Breakey, D., Meskell, C., Comparison of metrics for the evaluation of similarity in acoustic pressure signals, Journal of Sound and Vibration, 332, (15), 2013, p3605-3609
TARA - Full Text  DOI
Pellegrino, A., Meskell, C., Vortex shedding from a wind turbine blade section at high angles of attack, Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics, 121, 2013, p131-137
TARA - Full Text  DOI
Breakey, D.E.S., Fitzpatrick, J.A., Meskell, C., Aeroacoustic source analysis using time-resolved PIV in a free jet, Experiments in Fluids, 54, (5), 2013
DOI
Mahon, J., Meskell, C., Estimation of the time delay associated with damping controlled fluidelastic instability in a normal triangular tube array, Journal of Pressure Vessel Technology, Transactions of the ASME, 135, (3), 2013
DOI
P. Eret, C. Harris, G. O'Donnell, C. Meskell, A practical approach to investigating energy consumption of industrial compressed air systems, Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part A: Journal of Power and Energy, 226, (1), 2012, p28 - 36
DOI
More Publications and Other Research Outputs >>>
 

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Last Updated:02-AUG-2014