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Professor Michael Fitzgerald

Adjunct Professor (Psychiatry)
ST PATRICKS HOSPITAL


Michael Fitzgerald was the Henry Marsh Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at Trinity College, Dublin. He was the first Professor of Child Psychiatry in Ireland in 1996. A Clinical and Research Consultant to the Irish Society for Autism and an Honorary member of the Northern Ireland Institute of Human Relations. He has a doctorate in the area of autism and has been a researcher in this area since 1973. He trained at St. Patrick's Hospital Dublin, Chicago Medical School, and The Maudsley Hospital and the National Hospital for Nervous Diseases in London. He has clinically diagnosed over 2600 individuals with Autism and Asperger's syndrome and has served on the Government Task Force on Autism and the family as well as similar task forces for the Department of Health in Northern Ireland. He has contributed to National and International Journals on autism another relevant topics. He has written, co -written, edited or co-edited 25 books. He became an associate member of the British Psychoanalytic Society and the International Psychoanalytic Association in 1980 and was the first to practice here with this recognition. He is a member of the British Institute of Psychoanalysis. He initiated the first Masters programme in Adult Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy in the 1980's. In the 1990's he developed with Dr. Mary Smith a Masters programme in Child and Adolescent Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy at Trinity College Dublin and with Nessa Childers, Ross Skelton, Ann Murphy and others a Masters programme in Adult Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy at Trinity College Dublin. He founded the Journal the Irish Forum for Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy and the Irish Journal for Child Psychotherapy. He founded the Irish Standing Conference on Psychotherapy. He has been a tutor in Psychotherapy Queens University Belfast. He has supervised staff in training in psychotherapy at St. Ita's Hospital, St. Loman's Hospital, Artane Day Centre, Vergemount Hospital and St. Patrick's Hospital Dublin. Queens Square He has worked in the field of autism since 1973. His other special interest is Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. He is a member of the Royal College of Surgeons in England. He has been involved in research collaborations in 18 countries. He has been chairman of the Board of Management of two Schools for children with autism Ballyowen Meadows and Setanta for over 21 years. He has contributed to the media on over 250 occasions and presented six programmes on adolescence for RTE TV. He was a judge at the Aer Lingus Young Scientists and later the ESAT exhibition. His book "Autism and Creativity - Is There a Link Between Autism in Men and Exceptional Ability", Brunner Routledge Hove (2004) was described as the best book on Autism by Simon Baron-Cohen in Cambridge and as a 'must read' by nature. He has been an External Examiner at the University of London, Queens University Belfast and University College Dublin. He is on the (Adult) Psychiatry Specialist Medical Register and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Specialist Medical Register of the Irish Medical Council. He has been involved in research collaborations with Mount Sinai Hospital New York, Institute of Psychiatry London, Universities of Birmingham, Manchester, and Wales College of Medicine etc. He was the first Psychoanalyst recognised by the International Psychoanalytic Association founded by Sigmund Freud to work in the Republic of Ireland.
  ADD and Third Level Students   ADHD   Adolescent Psychiatry   ADULT SCHIZOPHRENIA   ASPERGER'S SYNDROME   ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER   AUTISM   Autism Genetics   AUTISM SPECTRUM   autistic psychopathy   BORDERLINE PERSONALITY   child and adolescent Psychiatry   CHILD PSYCHIATRY   COMMUNITY PSYCHIATRY   CONSULTATION LIAISON PSYCHIATRY   Conversation skills in schizophrenia   CREATIVITY   Criminal Autistic Psychopathy   FAMILIAL SCHIZOPHRENIA   GENETICS OF SCHIZOPHRENIA   genius   INFANTILE-AUTISM   mathematicians   neurodevelopmental psychiatry   Neuropsychiatry   PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA   personality of scientist and writers   PSYCHIATRY   Psychopathy   PSYCHOSIS, SCHIZOPHRENIA   Schizophrenia   SCHIZOPHRENIA FAMILIES   SCHIZOPHRENIA SUSCEPTIBILITY GENES   'SCHIZOPHRENIA-LIKE' PSYCHOSIS   scientists   SIMPLE SCHIZOPHRENIA   Writers and politics
Cleary l., Brady N., Fitzgerald M., Gallagher L., Holistic processing of faces as measured by the Thatcher illusion is intact in autism spectrum disorders., Autism : the international journal of research and practice, 1, 2014, p8 , Notes: [ABSTRACT: Impaired face perception in autism spectrum disorders is thought to reflect a perceptual style characterized by componential rather than configural processing of faces. This study investigated face processing in adolescents with autism spectrum disorders using the Thatcher illusion, a perceptual phenomenon exhibiting 'inversion effects' that characterize typical face processing. While previous studies used a limited range of face orientations, we measured perception of normality/grotesqueness of faces at seven orientations ranging from upright to inverted to allow for a detailed comparison of both reaction time and error by orientation profiles. We found that, like their typically developing peers, adolescents with autism spectrum disorders show strong inversion effects whereby reaction times were longer and error rates greater at inverted when compared to upright orientations. Additionally, the adolescents with autism spectrum disorders, like their peers in the typically developing group, show a marked nonlinearity in the error by orientation profile. Error is roughly constant out to 90° and then increases steeply, indicating a sudden shift from configural to local processing that reflects experience with faces in their typical orientations. These findings agree with recent reports that face perception is qualitatively similar in autistic and neurotypical groups.], Journal Article, PUBLISHED  DOI  URL
Caci H, Asherson P, Donfrancesco R, Faraone SV, Hervas A, Fitzgerald M, Döpfner M, Daily life impairments associated with childhood/adolescent attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder as recalled by adults: results from the European Lifetime Impairment Survey., CNS spectrums, 2014, p1 - 10, Notes: [(248) PMID: 24571924 ABSTRACT: Introduction The Lifetime Impairment Survey, conducted in Europe, assessed impairment and symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in childhood, and experiences of ADHD diagnosis and treatment, as recalled by adults. Adults with ADHD and without ADHD (control group) were invited to participate in an internet-based survey and report on their childhood experiences. History of ADHD diagnosis was self-reported. Groups were compared using impairment and symptom scales. Overall, 588 adults with ADHD and 736 without ADHD participated. Mean (standard deviation [SD]) age at diagnosis of ADHD was 20.0 (12.6) years (median 18.0) following consultation with 3.8 (5.1) doctors (median 2) over 44.6 (69.3) months (median 17.0). A total of 64.1% (377/588) of adults with ADHD reported frustration or difficulties during the diagnostic process. The ADHD group had a higher mean (SD) score versus control for general (3.3 [1.2] vs 2.1 [1.2]; p < 0.001) and school impairment (2.8 [0.7] vs 2.3 [0.6]; p < 0.001) but not home impairment (2.1 [0.5] for both groups). Discussion The survey demonstrated that ADHD had a negative impact on all aspects of childhood investigated, as recalled by adults. These data provide insights into childhood impairments and identify areas for improvement in the management and treatment of ADHD.], Journal Article, PUBLISHED  TARA - Full Text  DOI  URL  URL
H Caci, M Doepfner, P Asherson, R Donfrancesco, S V Faraone, A Hervas, M Fitzgerald , Daily life impairments associated with self-reported childhood/adolescent attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and experiences of diagnosis and treatment: Results from the European Lifetime Impairment Survey, European psychiatry : the journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists, 29, (5), 2014, p316 - 323, Notes: [(249) PMID: 11177785 ABSTRACT: The Lifetime Impairment Survey assessed impairment and symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children/adolescents from six European countries. Parents/caregivers of children/adolescents aged<20 years with ADHD (ADHD group; n=535) and without ADHD (control group; n=424) participated in an online survey. History of ADHD diagnosis was self-reported. ADHD and control groups were compared using impairment and symptom scales; higher scores indicate greater impairment. Mean (SD) age at ADHD diagnosis was 7.0 (2.8) years, following consultation of 2.7 (2.6) doctors over 20.4 (23.9) months. Parents/caregivers (64%; 344/535) reported frustration with some aspect of the diagnostic procedure; 74% (222/298) were satisfied with their child's current medication. ADHD had a negative impact on children/adolescents in all aspects of life investigated. The ADHD group had a higher mean (SD) school impairment score (2.7 [0.7]) compared with the control group (2.1 [0.7]; P<0.001) and were more likely to be in the bottom of their class (P<0.001). These data provide insights into impairments associated with ADHD in childhood/adolescence, and identify areas for improvement in its management and treatment.], Journal Article, PUBLISHED  DOI  URL  URL
Herve Caci, Philip Asherson, Renato Donfrancesco, Stephen V Faraone, Amaia Hervas, Michael Fitzgerald, Manfred Döpfner , Daily life impairments associated with childhood/adolescent attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder as recalled by adults, CNS spectrums , 2014, p1 - 10, Notes: [PMID: 24571924], Journal Article, PUBLISHED  DOI  URL  URL
Fitzgerald M., McNicholas F.,, Attitudes and practices in the management of ADHD among healthcare professionals who responded to a European survey, Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine, 31, 2014, p31 , Journal Article, PUBLISHED  URL
Caci H., Anderson P., Donfrancisco R., Farone S., Fitzgerald M., Doepfner M., , Daily Life Impairments Associated with Childhood/Adolescent ADHD as Recalled by Adults: Results from the European Lifetime Impairment Survey, CNS spectrums, 2014, p1 - 10, Notes: [PMID: 24571924 Introduction The Lifetime Impairment Survey, conducted in Europe, assessed impairment and symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in childhood, and experiences of ADHD diagnosis and treatment, as recalled by adults. Adults with ADHD and without ADHD (control group) were invited to participate in an internet-based survey and report on their childhood experiences. History of ADHD diagnosis was self-reported. Groups were compared using impairment and symptom scales. Overall, 588 adults with ADHD and 736 without ADHD participated. Mean (standard deviation [SD]) age at diagnosis of ADHD was 20.0 (12.6) years (median 18.0) following consultation with 3.8 (5.1) doctors (median 2) over 44.6 (69.3) months (median 17.0). A total of 64.1% (377/588) of adults with ADHD reported frustration or difficulties during the diagnostic process. The ADHD group had a higher mean (SD) score versus control for general (3.3 [1.2] vs 2.1 [1.2]; p < 0.001) and school impairment (2.8 [0.7] vs 2.3 [0.6]; p < 0.001) but not home impairment (2.1 [0.5] for both groups). Discussion The survey demonstrated that ADHD had a negative impact on all aspects of childhood investigated, as recalled by adults. These data provide insights into childhood impairments and identify areas for improvement in the management and treatment of ADHD.], Journal Article, PUBLISHED  DOI  URL
Young., Fitzgerald M., Postma MJ., , ADHD: Making the Invisible Visible , Shire AG, 2013, Notes: [ http://new.professormichaelfitzgerald.eu/], Book, PUBLISHED  URL
Fitzgerald M.,, Studies of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Irish Populations, European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry , 22, (2), 2013, pS111 , Notes: [(97)], Journal Article, PUBLISHED  URL
Fitzgerald M., , Overlap between Schizophrenia and Autism Spectrum Disorders , European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 22, (2), 2013, pS112-, Notes: [98. ], Journal Article, PUBLISHED  URL
Johnson K., Barry E., Fitzgerald M., McNicholas F., Kirley A., Gill M., Belgrove M., Hawi Z.,, Methlphenidate side effect profile is influenced by genetic variation in the ADHD-associated CES1 gene, Journal of child and adolescent psychopharmacology, 23, (10), 2013, p655 - 664, Notes: [PMID: 24350812 ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: A naturalistic, prospective study of the influence of genetic variation on dose prescribed, clinical response, and side effects related to stimulant medication in 77 children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was undertaken. The influence of genetic variation of the CES1 gene coding for carboxylesterase 1A1 (CES1A1), the major enzyme responsible for the first-pass, stereoselective metabolism of methylphenidate, was investigated. METHODS: Parent- and teacher-rated behavioral questionnaires were collected at baseline when the children were medication naïve, and again at 6 weeks while they were on medication. Medication dose, prescribed at the discretion of the treating clinician, and side effects, were recorded at week 6. Blood and saliva samples were collected for genotyping. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected in the coding, non-coding and the 3' flanking region of the CES1 gene. Genetic association between CES1 variants and ADHD was investigated in an expanded sample of 265 Irish ADHD families. Analyses were conducted using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and logistic regression models. RESULTS: None of the CES1 gene variants were associated with the dose of methylphenidate provided or the clinical response recorded at the 6 week time point. An association between two CES1 SNP markers and the occurrence of sadness as a side effect of short-acting methylphenidate was found. The two associated CES1 markers were in linkage disequilibrium and were significantly associated with ADHD in a larger sample of ADHD trios. The associated CES1 markers were also in linkage disequilibrium with two SNP markers of the noradrenaline transporter gene (SLC6A2). CONCLUSIONS: This study found an association between two CES1 SNP markers and the occurrence of sadness as a side effect of short-acting methylphenidate. These markers were in linkage disequilibrium together and with two SNP markers of the noradrenaline transporter gene.], Journal Article, PUBLISHED  DOI  URL  URL
  

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